Available courses

This module covers the case management process including working with a return-to-work team that includes internal personnel and external service providers. The return-to work process including assessment, return-to-work planning, implementation, monitoring and adaptation, and evaluation is examined.

The human resources department is a key stakeholder in the disability management process as the department is involved in a number of areas that will be important in a return to work including benefit provision, claims management and job descriptions and placements. Disability management policies need to align with those of the human resources department and with employments standards acts. This course provides an overview of the linkages between HR and DM.

The skills and knowledge required to analyze conflicts and to develop strategies for satisfying the interests of all stakeholders will be covered—with a specific focus on return-to-work situations. The steps in resolving conflicts are explored including initially getting people to the table to discuss and define the problem and, as interests are identified, considering ways to expand the benefits that are available as part of the solution.

This module covers the process of implementing low to high tech assistive devices and technology in the accommodation of a worker with disabilities. The process includes evaluating the needs of the employee; researching and choosing the most appropriate equipment, software or other job aid; researching and choosing the best supplier; developing a business case for the application; testing the technology and training the worker as necessary; maintaining the assistive technology; and evaluating the outcomes.

Different approaches to job analysis are examined and participants will be provided with skills and knowledge relating to the job analysis process from the perspective of disability management.

Workers' compensation income, services, and requirements play a crucial role in returning an employee who has incurred an occupational injury or illness to the workplace. This module explores the knowledge required to provide information about income replacement to employees; to interact with workers' compensation representatives about funding for treatment, rehabilitation and services such as counselling, special equipment or adaptations to the work station, gradual or part-time returns, and training; to identify available expertise within the workers compensation organization; and to fulfill any Board requirements.

This course provides an overview of the process of ethical reasoning, professional ethics, and ethical decision making.

Participants will examine human rights laws and the requirement for accommodation as it applies to workers with disabilities. Other acts that impact on accommodation and disability will be considered.  

Participants will examine human rights laws and the requirement for accommodation as it applies to workers with disabilities. Other acts that impact on accommodation and disability will be considered.  

This module provides an overview of workplace safety programs and wellness programs. The interaction of such programs with the disability management program is explored.

The purpose of this module is to examine diversity issues including attitudes towards minorities and people with disabilities, to consider how diversity issues can affect a return to work, and to explore strategies for dealing with cultural differences during the return to work process. Common components of diversity programs will be outlined and the interaction between diversity programs and disability management programs will be examined

Interviewing strategies are explored as is their contribution to a problem-solving process in which Return to Work Coordinators identify barriers to return to work, resources that might be helpful in the process, and options that might be part of an integrated plan. Effective interviewing skills are essential in carrying out the three-stage model of helping that is presented in this module. The difference between helping and therapy is considered along with how and when to refer clients for professional counseling. It is recommended that participants take Module G before Module H unless they have had a recent course in communications skills.

Participants will explore what kind of program and client information is collected, how it is collected and used, and what issues of confidentiality are involved. The applicability of Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS) is considered. Also examined will be the Return to Work Coordinator’s role in collecting information on community services and resources, keeping professional skills and knowledge up to date, and researching information on an as needed basis.

Participants will explore the communication skills that form the basis of the interview and how they are used together to create an interaction in which the returning worker becomes an active partner in the return-to-work process. Communication techniques for formal interviews and informal discussions will be considered including those that involve supervisors and other stakeholders in the return to work process.

This module covers the planning and development of internal communications programs aimed at creating support for disability management among management and labor, employees who might incur disabilities, and their coworkers. The requirement for external communications components is examined including education and information targeted to medical and other service providers.

An overview of mental health issues in the workplace is provided along with a more in-depth focus on stress and depression. Participants will explore symptoms, treatments and strategies for assisting individuals with to return to work.

The purpose of this module is not to enable Return to Work Coordinators to become proficient in the administration, scoring, or interpretation of different assessment approaches or tests but instead, to provide them with an understanding of the purpose of each assessment, what a Return to Work Coordinator can expect as outcome information, and how to work effectively with different assessment professionals.

Participants will obtain a basic understanding of the body systems (respiratory, pulmonary, etc.); treatment providers and the type of information that they are likely to provide; and the impact of physical impairments on individuals and their work.

Different approaches to job analysis are examined and participants will be provided with skills and knowledge relating to the job analysis process from the perspective of disability management.

Various aspects of labour relations impact disability management including the collective agreement and provincial labor relations act. Memorandums of agreement and letters of intent used in establishing programs and joint committees will be examined. Support from worker representatives enhances the likelihood that the program and individual returns to work will be successful.  Dispute resolution in a union setting will be explored.

An overview of mental health issues in the workplace is provided along with a more in-depth focus on stress and depression. Participants will explore symptoms, treatments and strategies for assisting individuals with to return to work.

Topics covered include the elements of the plan; the roles of people involved in the process ranging from medical service providers to coworkers; types of accommodations; and the hierarchy of return-to-work options.

This module is designed to enable participants to apply theories of change in practical ways. The administrators of disability management programs must be able to adapt to external changes ranging from the effects of new technology to new legislation and regulation. Internal policies and procedures will affect, and be affected by, the disability management program. Individual returns to work may be influenced by changes within the organization or by the effect of personal changes in physical and other capacities.

In this overview, participants will examine the field of disability management, the rationale for establishing a disability management program, various structures for providing a return-to-work capacity within an organization, and the process followed in setting up a disability management program or analyzing an existing program.

Participants will obtain a basic understanding of the body systems (respiratory, pulmonary, etc.); treatment providers and the type of information that they are likely to provide; and the impact of physical impairments on individuals and their work.

Topics covered include the elements of the plan; the roles of people involved in the process ranging from medical service providers to coworkers; types of accommodations; and the hierarchy of return-to-work options.

Participants will review the four management functions of planning, operating, leading and controlling, and how they relate to the administration of disability management programs. Data collection and analysis, including cost-benefit analyses, and budgeting are important aspects of program administration. Many stakeholders will have a role in the planning and implementation of a return to work plan for an employee who has incurred temporary or permanent impairments and the DM practitioner will need to involve others and gain their support.

Topics covered include the elements of the plan; the roles of people involved in the process ranging from medical service providers to coworkers; types of accommodations; and the hierarchy of return-to-work options.

The human resources department is a key stakeholder in the disability management process as the department is involved in a number of areas that will be important in a return to work including benefit provision, claims management and job descriptions and placements. Disability management policies need to align with those of the human resources department and with employments standards acts. This course provides an overview of the linkages between HR and DM.

In this overview, participants will examine the field of disability management, the rationale for establishing a disability management program, various structures for providing a return-to-work capacity within an organization, and the process followed in setting up a disability management program or analyzing an existing program.

In this overview, participants will examine the field of disability management, the rationale for establishing a disability management program, various structures for providing a return-to-work capacity within an organization, and the process followed in setting up a disability management program or analyzing an existing program.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to interviewing techniques that are effective in a workplace health context. Participants will explore and demonstrate communication skills that they can use to uncover challenges and opportunities and develop effective responses to both. Models of helping and the potential and limitations of the helping role will be explored.

This course introduces students to the scope of ergonomics and the application of ergonomic principles to the design of work. It includes an overview of concepts and related theory and ergonomic assessment tools and techniques.  Students will learn to take a systems approach to a workplace concern, conduct a task analysis, identify risks in the job (physical, cognitive, organizational), assess risk using various tools, and recommend solutions for both proactive design of workplaces, and redesign of work to accommodate workers with disabilities or limitations.

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the field of occupational health, including the major components of an occupational health and safety program and management system. Processes related to identifying, measuring and mitigating risks to health and safety will be explored.

This course will introduce students to the foundations of Disability Management based on the current guidelines and principles of practice. It will provide students with a broad understanding of the field of disability management, the approaches that are employed in returning a worker with a disability to a job, and the interaction between the disability management program and a range of internal and external stakeholders. It will introduce students to relevant research from a broad range of disciplines including disability management, social work, occupational therapy, ergonomics, mental health, occupational health, case management and business trends.

The purpose of this course is for students to explore a workplace health science issue relevant to a work sector. Students will be expected to identify a work sector and a relevant issue such as prevention of injury, disability or promotion of health in the workplace. Students will do a literature review of grey, policy and evidence literature and develop a website to share that organizes the knowledge and summaries key information to promote and share the knowledge on a workplace issue within a work sector.

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